TAKE OUT – phrasal verb – meanings and examples

The English phrasal verb TAKE OUT has the following meanings:

1. Take out = to borrow something from an establishment

(transitive) When you take something (a library book, a loan) for temporary use from a formal establishment. Synonyms are rent, obtain, or acquire.

  • I took out a loan to help pay for my tuition.
  • Instead of buying that new book, you can take it out from the library.
  • I was able to take out a mortgage to buy my first house.

2. Take out = to remove

(transitive) When something is extracted or removed from its current place. Synonyms are expel or withdraw.

  • I had to have two teeth taken out.
  • He took out his phone and recorded her phone number.
  • I need to take my car out of the garage.
  • The trash smells bad. Can you take it out please?
  • Have you had your appendix taken out?

3. Take out = to go out with someone

(transitive) When you go out with someone, often on a date but also just as company. Synonyms include woo or court.

  • Where did he take you out last night?
  • On our first date, Mark took me out to the cinema.
  • Jenny takes me out to a new restaurant every weekend.
  • Let me take you out to dinner some time.

4. Take out = to destroy or kill

(transitive – informal) to kill or disable a person or destroy a place.

  • They took out the enemy base with long range missiles.
  • The sniper took out many soldiers before his hiding place was discovered.

Take out – Summary Chart

TAKE OUT - Meanings and examples of this English Phrasal Verb

Lesson tags: Out, Phrasal Verbs, Take
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